Tag Archives: Museum

Washington, D.C. Bound

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The husband and I are embarking on a mini-summer vacation to Washington, D.C. this weekend, and I cannot wait to get away! Though our visit will be short, I’m hoping to squeeze in as much as possible—a little museum time, a couple choice restaurants, and plenty of time with my fabulous extended family, most of which call Maryland and the East Coast home. Having lived in D.C. for a short while, and having visited countless times, I won’t be hitting all the sites, but instead just a couple favorites, most likely the National Museum of Natural History and The Phillips Collection.

My younger brother, who resides in D.C., volunteers at the Natural History Museum’s O. Orkin Insect Zoo, where he spreads his lifelong, and passionate love of wildlife with museum visitors. As he’s had an obsession with all things creepy crawly since forever, (his third birthday cake featured a frosting-drawn scorpion a la my artistic mother) visiting the Natural History Museum was always mandatory during family trips to D.C., a visit that has now become a loved tradition. I, on the other hand, cannot visit D.C. without stopping by The Phillips Collection, my absolutely favorite museum, and locale of a short but wonderful internship prior to my starting graduate school. Set apart from the National Mall, hidden amidst the Dupont Circle neighborhood, The Phillips Collection displays an incredible collection of Modern and Contemporary works, a collection began by husband and wife duo, Duncan and Marjorie Phillips. The intimate and enthralling museum winds through both the Phillips’ original three-story town home, as well as more contemporary gallery spaces which have been added over the years, overall encompassing 60,000 square feet along 21st St. If I had a “collecting allowance,” as Duncan Phillips received from his parents in 1916, my ideal collection would mirror that of the Phillips. Though I return again and again to re-visit my favorite works by Cézanne, Dufy, Bonnard, Tack, amongst many others….I love that the galleries are also always shifting, works moved to new locations not to fit a chronological timeline, but instead to spark conversation, to reveal new artistic connections.

Paul Cézanne, The Garden at Les Lauves (Le Jardin des Lauves), ca. 1906, Oil on canvas

Raoul Dufy, The Artist’s Studio, 1935, Oil on canvas

Pierre Bonnard, The Open Window, 1921, Oil on canvas

Augustus Vincent Tack, Ecstasy, 1929, Oil on canvas on wallboard

*images: Arch Land Blog edited by Good Old Modern // The Phillips Collection

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Filed under Landscape

Art in Bloom

The Milwaukee Art Museum’s annual event, Art in Bloom: A Tribute to Art and Flowers, April 11-14, 2013, features stunning floral arrangements, created by local designers, paired with works from the museum’s collection. This event has become a favorite of mine over the years, and is certainly a welcome breath of spring this year, after a full week of rain.  I tend to gravitate toward the arrangements which subtly mirror their counterparts, and this year’s arrangements did not disappoint—many of the artfully arranged blooms, graceful studies of color and emotion, rather than direct imitations of composition. [all photos by Michael Brown]

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

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Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old ModernArt in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old ModernArt in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

Art in Bloom, photo by Michael Brown | Good Old Modern

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Filed under Still Life

6 Months

Celebrating 6 months of marriage today with the husband, though it feels like our wedding was yesterday. Enjoying flipping through the pages of Couples in Art, featuring Artworks from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which played the part of our wedding guestbook.

Jean-Michel Folon, The Shadows, 1980, Watercolor and graphite on paper

Édouard Manet, Boating, 1874, Oil on canvas

Goya (Francisco de Goya y Lucientes), The Swing, 1796–97, Brush, indian ink, and gray wash on laid Netherlandish paper

Shepherd and Shepherdess Making Music, ca. 1500–1530, South Netherlandish, Wool warp; wool and silk wefts

Auguste Rodin, Eternal Spring, probably modeled ca. 1881, executed 1907, Marble

Lynn Bostick, Conversation on a Boat Deck, 1983, Watercolor, graphite, crayon and cut and pasted papers on paper

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Filed under Portrait

Home as Museum

Though I love the idea of an art-filled home, there are some interiors out there that are beyond over the top. Nevertheless, these spaces are entrancing.

One such home, situated in New York City’s Upper West Side, overlooking Central Park, is worth upwards of $20 million, every surface covered in covetable works—a 2,500 year old quilt set alongside a wood table and chair set by 20th century artisan George Nakashimi, corinthian columns extending from the living room floor to 24 foot-high ceilings, covered in a mural by Madrid-based artist Ramon Canet.

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Filed under The Studio

Collectors

Damien Hirst
I Want Love, 1999
Butterflies and household gloss on canvas

Damien Hirst
I Feel Love, 1994-1995
Butterflies and household gloss on canvas

Damien Hirst
Untitled, 1992
Screenprint on paper

Saturday marked the Milwaukee Public Museum’s annual Collector’s Day, where collectors from across the region exhibited their own anthologies for visitors to peruse. My own love of collecting started with my mother’s childhood collections of rocks and shells, neatly displayed in shoe boxes, which never cease to amaze me.

My urge to collect has continued, in the form of ticket stubs, charms, old sheet music, corks from special occasions—each of which I love to pull out of hiding, when in the mood to reminisce. As of late, I have undertaken the endeavor of freeing my collections from their boxes and closet shelves, quite determined to find spots for each where I can actually admire them. So far a few of the prized assemblages have found homes—our corks relocated to a lovely old mason jar I found at a local antique store, and my collection of old sheet music from my grandfather, now displayed in our bedroom using Magnart magnets (love these by the way, a fairly affordable display system for items you like to change out frequently).

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Filed under Still Life